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Portus - 10 Great Horrea of Septimius Severus

To the north of the entrance channel (2) leading to the hexagon and to the west of the hexagon is a large warehouse, known as the Great Horrea of Septimius Severus. They were in fact made during the reign of Marcus Aurelius. The building was excavated by order of the Torlonia family.

The cellae are arranged around three sides of a courtyard (there are no rooms to the south) and are behind a porticus. The longest side measures c. 186 metres. The rooms and the porticus were covered by cross-vaults. The rooms on the east side are deeper than those on the north and west side. In the door-jambs are travertine corner-stones, with holes in the front corner. Their purpose is not clear. In the back walls of the rooms are two windows. The building had at least one upper floor. Four staircases were found.



Plan of the horrea. Testaguzza 1970, p. 192.



The ruins of the horrea. Note the travertine corner-stones with holes.
Photograph: Jan Theo Bakker.




The ruins of the horrea.
Photograph: Jan Theo Bakker.




The interior of a cella.
Photograph: Jan Theo Bakker.




Reconstruction drawing of the horrea, seen from the south-east
(from the hexagon). Lugli-Filibeck 1935, fig. 51.




Reconstruction drawing of the horrea, seen from the south-west. By Italo Gismondi.
Museo della Civiltà Romana. Testaguzza 1970, p. 192.

[jthb - 22-May-2009]